INCLUSION OF RHODIOLA SPECIES IN APPENDIX II OF CITES

INCLUSION OF RHODIOLA SPECIES IN APPENDIX II OF CITES

INCLUSION OF RHODIOLA SPECIES IN APPENDIX II OF CITES

What is CITES?

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), is an international agreement between states, the objective of which is to prevent, through the application of common standards, international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants from seriously endangering their survival.

Some 5800 animal and 30,000 plant species are protected by CITES against over-exploitation through international trade. Species are classified in appendices, each of which denotes a different level of protection from trade.

Appendix I includes species threatened with extinction due to international trade. Permissions are required for import and export, and trade for commercial purposes is prohibited.

Appendix II includes species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction but could become so unless trade is strictly controlled. Exports of plants, animals or related products are permitted if they are legally obtained and their collection is not detrimental to the species' chances of survival.

Appendix III includes species that are threatened (including locally) in at least one country and that the parties to the treaty have been asked to help control trade.

Rhodiola: current status and context.

Rhodiola is a hardy perennial plant that grows in regions of the world with extreme climatic conditions, such as Siberia, Alaska and Scandinavia.

Its root is used in many food supplements for its adaptogenic effects that help combat stress, increase resistance to high-performance physical and mental activities and have an antioxidant effect, among other benefits.

The bad news is that rhodiola has been included in the update of CITES Appendices I, II and III that has been in force since 21 May 2023, placing it in Appendix II (Annex B of Regulation (EC) 338/97) with the following annotation: "All parts and derivatives, except: a) seeds and pollen; and b) finished products packaged and ready for retail trade".

Accordingly, rhodiola used as raw material in the European Union shall be subject to controls and to the presentation of an import permit issued by a management authority of the Member State of destination at the customs office corresponding to the point of introduction.